SUPERFOODS Series: GINSENG

panax-ginseng-root-extractWhy do people take ginseng?

Ginseng has traditionally been used for a number of medical conditions. However, only a fraction of them have been seriously researched.

There are two main types of ginseng: Asian or Korean ginseng (Panax ginseng) and American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius). Studies have found that the different types have different benefits. In traditional Chinese medicine, American ginseng is considered less stimulating than the Asian variety.

Although many other herbs are called ginseng — like eleuthero, or Siberian ginseng — they do not contain the active ingredient of ginsenosides.

Some studies have found that ginseng may boost the immune system. There is some evidence that one particular type of American ginseng extract might decrease the number and severity of colds in adults.

Several studies in people have also shown that ginseng may lower blood sugar levels.

There is some early evidence that ginseng might temporarily — and modestly — improve concentration and learning. In some studies of mental performance, ginseng has been combined with ginkgo. While these studies are intriguing, many experts feel that we need more evidence.

Ginseng has also been studied as a way to improve mood and boost endurance as well as treat cancer, heart disease, fatigue, erectile dysfunction, hepatitis C, high blood pressure, menopausal symptoms, and other conditions. While some of these uses are promising, the evidence isn’t conclusive.

How much ginseng should you take?

Standard doses of ginseng have not been established for any condition. Quality and active ingredients in supplements may vary widely from maker to maker. This makes it very hard to establish a standard dose.

Always buy ginseng from a well-respected company. Because it’s an expensive root, there is a risk that disreputable manufacturers might sell adulterated ginseng or include less than advertised on the bottle.

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George M
Fitness Instructor
Certified Personal Trainer by I.S.S.A., CPR

Source:

Longe, J., ed. The Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine, second edition, 2004.

Natural Standard Patient Monograph: “Ginseng.”

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine web site: “Asian Ginseng.”

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