How to Get Rid of Cellulite – The Sexy Summer Legs Diet

how-to-get-rid-of-celluliteFond of food? Maybe you call it cottage cheese. Or orange peel. Love your bed? Then perhaps you affectionately dubbed it mattress skin. Or hail damage if you’re into meteorology and don’t mind your ego being given a thorough thumping. Let’s not even get into all the different names doctors have for it … but to paraphrase Shakespeare, cellulite by any other name would vex as much.

Who gets cellulite?

If you don’t suffer it, lucky – lucky – you. Be grateful, for you are the exception. To everyone else, be consoled by the fact that you are the rule. Cellulite is thought to affect a mind-boggling 90% of women and even men don’t escape it’s clutches (10% are afflicted). And that’s the crux of it, whether you’re a size 6 or 16, size has little to do with it. Skinny supermodels have it, super fit athletes have it, even twenty-year olds have it. But in the same breath, there are women carrying a fair amount of extra weight, without a single dimple (or even stretch mark!) to be found anywhere. Cellulite isn’t so much a fat problem, as it is a skin problem. The type of fat that makes us fat, isn’t the same kind as the fat that causes cellulite. Yes, carrying extra weight can make it worse, but it’s not the root cause.

And if you didn’t already know, cellulite not only afflicts the thighs and butt, but also the knees, the belly and even the upper arms. In some women cellulite is immediately obvious with conspicuous areas of lumpy skin, deep dimples, and creases, while in others cellulite is “only” noticeable when pressing the skin.

What causes cellulite?

Despite the fact that it can send the most composed of women into a tizzy, cellulite is purely a crisis of looks, not one of health. In terms of what precisely causes cellulite, science doesn’t have clear answers for that yet. Most likely there are a cascade of causative factors – not one simple trigger. Genetics, hormones (particularly estrogen), extra weight, smoking, stress, poor diet, high alcohol consumption, and lack of exercise are thought to instigate, contribute to or exacerbate cellulite. However, cellulite is treatable, even if genetics are involved. Just because you have a genetic predisposition to cellulite, doesn’t mean you have to actually develop cellulite. There is a lot you can do to treat, reduce and/ or prevent cellulite. And if you currently do not suffer cellulite, it may be because you do not have cellulite – yet.  It’s worth remembering that cellulite is estimated to affect 90% of women, which means that if you don’t suffer with cellulite you should assume that someday you will, and take steps to prevent it. It may be clichéd, but it’s true: prevention is better than cure!

HOW TO GET RID OF CELLULITE

There are a dizzying number of anti-cellulite products on offer, with most cellulite remedies targeting the skin directly – creams, lotions and other potions, massage, lasers and liposuction. Yet so far most of these treatments haven’t shown to offer long-lasting results, if any results at all. And analyzing the triggers, it makes sense. None of these treatments are addressing the root cause of cellulite, at least not in any meaningful and lasting manner. To treat cellulite, you have to start from within. In other words, don’t just treat the symptom, treat the cause. Feeding and repairing your skin from within can reduce, eliminate and prevent cellulite in several ways:

  • Strengthen blood vessels/ boost circulation. This is a key step in reducing cellulite, as blood vessels are the pathways by which nutrients important for healthy skin reach the dermis (the layer of skin which is damaged, causing cellulite). Strengthening blood vessels and increasing blood flow helps to nourish skin cells and help remove toxins.
  • Promote the production of collagen, elastin and healthy connective tissue. The reason collagen is so important is because healthy, youthful looking skin depends upon it. Collagen found within connective tissue is the main structural protein of the skin and when it becomes damaged, it’s not pretty. Firm, strong and healthy collagen provides structural support. It prevents fat cells from breaking through the lower layer of skin (where it belongs) and reaching the top layer of the skin where they cause the skin to become lumpy and uneven.
  • Hydrate and lock water into cells. Hydrated cells are strong and firm, and act as barrier stopping fat cells from pushing to the top of the skin where they become visible and cause dimpling associated with cellulite.
  • Prevent and repair free-radical damage, which can damage skin, predisposing it to cellulite.
  • Decrease inflammation, which if prolonged (chronic) can cause free-radical damage and cell wall deterioration, increasing the likelihood of cellulite.
  • Rebuild cell walls. Stronger cells walls means your cells are better able to keep water in and remain hydrated.

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source: Supper Skinny me

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Categories: Health|Fitness

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3 replies

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